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[personal profile] futurelegend
I heard in passing of a couple of recently-published books that are whinging about the mediocrity of endeavour that is so prolific in the world wide web. And also, presumably, that this fact is dumbing down (an ugly, boorish term itself) our societies and cultures on a mass scale.

Yes, there is an almightly lot of drivel out here in the wilds. But your discerning viewer, reader and voracious consumer of ideas and emotionally fulfilling hentai is no less discerning now than back in the good old days.* There's just an awful lot more "content" out there to avoid in the quest for intellectual enlightenment.

And the potential of the flipside of the argument is staggering. Now, a large range of worthy, significant, profound and beautiful endeavours - hitherto found only in books with small print, poncy university courses, subtitled films, obscure, self-published magazines, etc - are only a few random google searches and hyperlinks away from anyone.

Of course, that all said, probably most of the world's population doesn't know what an internet is, let alone that it is equally an amazing Swiss Army knife tool for depraved and superficial gratification and a medium that could rival the collective unconscious for the storage and communication of Stuff** that is significant to humans. (And it's usually the best fun when you stumble on a site that provides both, simultaneously.) Our horizons expand :/ (After all, cultural studies strikes me as a looking glass anthropology, where the unknown and unexpected remains in the control of the anthropologist. And remember, one may often feel like an anthropologist at any time, in any place but, as my friend Sandy says, you probably couldn't eat a whole one.)


* Depending on personal mood and inclination, "the good old days" are anything from the cave painting days of 40,000 years ago to pre-1983.

** Hi Mel, welcome to the Idiocracy! ... "Stuff's got electrolytes!"


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Right, so. The point is that I found this:

http://www.geocities.com/liorahchanah/yetzer_temimut.html

An interesting take on some of the ideas on spirituality, identity and enlightenment in The Divine Invasion. (Philip K Dick. Last lj post. Natch.)

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mel

September 2010

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